Nautical Napkins

I was walking through my local stitch shop drooling over the beautiful fabric they have scattered throughout the store.

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See that little stack with the red & blue lobsters? It called to me. I picked up the sweet little stack and drooled over the variations! The light blue whales in the top left corner was not part of the original group, but since the bride had a whale theme I felt the need to include them.

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I then tried to figure out what size to make the napkins since they were pre-cut fat quarters.

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Do I go for the large size? Medium? Small?

I finally decided on the small size, each quarter becoming 4 small napkins.

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Having a cutting board, ruler and rotary cutter has been amazing. It makes a huge difference in terms of cutting a bunch at time.

I followed these steps to make mitered corners. It became easier and easier to make each one. The burnt fingers was not fun, but using an iron made a HUGE difference.

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In the end the napkins worked out perfectly and were so much fun to do. I can’t wait to make more!

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xoxo Hannah

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The PurlBee’s DIY Citrus Coasters

I made these sweet coasters using a tutorial from The PurlBee, and they’re great!  On top of looking adorable, they are very straightforward and a great activity for those of us who like to have something to work on while unwinding after a long day.  For a complete rundown, and the pattern for cutting out the felt pieces, check out the original tutorial here:

What you’ll need:

  • citrus-colored felt (I was easily able to find yellow, orange, green, a blood-orange red, and a hot pink)
  • white felt
  • white embroidery floss (I went with this for a chunkier look than the original one)
  • a big, sharp needle
  • sharp scissors
  • for best results, I recommend adding a glass of wine
  • this pattern from The PurlBee

Then:

  1. I found it most helpful to cut out as many pieces ahead of time as possible, so I wouldn’t need to keep going back and forth from cutting to sewing.
  2. It would be redundant for me to rehash all the steps from The PurlBee, but I will add a couple tips:
    • You should be prepared to wing it a bit!  The pieces don’t always line up exactly how you want them to, which is tricky because you’re trying to form a little circle out of wedge-shapes, so be prepared to have to trim them as you go!
    • The pieces may shift around a bit while you’re sewing them, even if you’re able to pin them down.  I found it worked fine (and was maybe easier) to lay the pieces out to start, then set all but one wedge aside and just sew one at a time.  There are fewer pins to accidentally jab yourself with that way.
    • Experiment and have fun!

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